What is SETI@home?

SETI@home is a scientific experiment, based at UC Berkeley, that uses Internet-connected computers in the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI). You can participate by running a free program that downloads and analyzes radio telescope data.

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User of the Day

User profile Profile Yutaka Kobayashi
occupation: SCF hobbies: Inayama

News

Weekly Outage and Initial Catch Up
Every Tuesday morning (Pacific time) we begin a ten hour data distribution outage for database and systems maintenance. The upload/download servers will be offline during this time. Afterwards you may experience connectivity issues for several more hours as the servers catch up with demand.
24 Jan 2017, 16:11:24 UTC


Engadget article on SETI
Engadget has published an article on SETI which includes discussion of Breakthrough Listen and SETI@home.
28 May 2017, 18:10:59 UTC · Discuss


New SETI@home web article in "The Atlantic"
The Atlantic has published a new article entitled A Brief History of SETI@home featuring interviews of Dan Werthimer, David Anderson, and Eric Korpela.
24 May 2017, 1:04:44 UTC · Discuss


Dr. Steve Croft on Deep Astronomy
Berkeley SETI's Steve Croft is joining other SETI and exoplanet researchers on Deep Astronomy right now (4 pm PDT, 2300 UTC). If you join live you can ask questions of these scientists.
17 May 2017, 23:14:45 UTC · Discuss


Free Speech and SETI@home
Once again I need to explain our policies on free speech, as I've been getting lots of nastygrams both here and on twitter and facebook.

First, let me explain our relationship to the UC Berkeley administration. Despite the fact that I met with the Chancellor once for about 15 seconds, the UC administration neither knows nor cares that SETI@home exists. Threats of quitting SETI@home or withholding donations will be about as effective as kicking a stray dog because you don't like something the dog catcher did. They won't notice. They don't care. They get no direct benefit from SETI@home, so here will be no effect on them, or the on University. We could shut off our servers tomorrow, and nobody in Sproul Hall would notice a thing.

So here are our project commandments on free speech.

0. Thine speech is free as in freedom, not free as in beer.
1. Thou mayst speak thine mind.
2. Thou shalt do so in the appropriate forum.
3. Thou shalt recognize that speech has consequences to thine self and to others, some legal, some financial, some painful.
4. Thou shalt not force others to pay for the delivery of or the consequences of speech they may not agree with.
5. On public SETI@home forums, thou shalt use language a parent would not mind their 12 year old hearing.
6. Failure to obey the forum rules will result in moderator action. If thou dost not understand, see thou commandment 4.

In other words, if you want to be heard on the current controversy, try the Politics forum. Then use twitter, facebook, instagram and whatever social media you want. SETI@home in general and me in particular have no power to effect change of any sort.

It sounds like there's still going to be a riot in Berkeley tomorrow because a group of white supremacists and a group of left wing anarchists are ignoring commandments 2, 3, and 4. The people of Berkeley and the people of California will be picking up the tab for their "freedom of speech" whether they want to or not. And personally, I think that's what's been missing from the whole discussion.
27 Apr 2017, 3:50:26 UTC · Discuss


Where we get the data
Thanks for helping us analyze Breakthrough Listen data from the Green Bank Telescope! Berkeley SETI engineer Dave MacMahon takes us behind the scenes into the server room at Green Bank where the Listen instrument lives, and we also interview Green Bank director Karen O'Neil about keeping computers cool in our latest video: https://youtu.be/-gQocykdo1Y

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Instagram @BerkeleySETI
10 Apr 2017, 23:06:21 UTC · Discuss


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SETI@home and Astropulse are funded by grants from the National Science Foundation, NASA, and donations from SETI@home volunteers. AstroPulse is funded in part by the NSF through grant AST-0307956.